Rosemary Garlic Fougasse

A crusty finish gives way to a tender, flavorful crust in this Rosemary Garlic Fougasse. It features a simple white dough base with added, customizable flavors.

Rosemary Garlic Fougasse

I am a self-described Francophile, especially when it comes to breads and pastries. If it exists, the French probably do it better. And they’ll make it look while they’re at it too. There’s just something so simple and elegant about how French recipes look and taste, even if it’s a technically complicated recipe. Which this one isn’t, I assure you.

Take fougasse, for example. It’s roughly the equivalent of Italian focaccia–they words are actually from the same root! But it’s somehow a bit, well, more than focaccia is. Maybe it’s the beautiful leaf pattern cut into the dough. Maybe it’s the crustier finish the cuts give while still keeping the soft, pillowy inside. I feel like that contrast is the best part of artisan bread–the crunch and snap that yields to soft, tender crumb.

Rosemary Garlic Fougasse

I should probably state that I really do LOVE focaccia–it’s simple and soft, and really beautiful. In fact, I have a recipe that you can find by clicking here. It’s legit, as my four year old would say. But this Rosemary Garlic Fougasse? It’s just…next level. And the cutting is really the only added step, which took me like 2 minutes per flatbread, tops. I will say that there is a learning curve to it. My first try stuck to the counter (I know, rookie mistake) and by the time I peeled it off, it looked a little bit um, rustic. But that’s why we make two! One can be the practice round.

I promise you though, no matter what they look like, they’ll do this magic disappearing act as soon as you put them up for grabs.

Rosemary Garlic Fougasse

Rosemary Garlic Fougasse Baker’s Notes:

  • Rise times will vary based on the temperature of the room it’s rising in, so all times are just an average/estimate. Base the dough’s readiness on the size–it should be doubled in bulk.
  • The dough is much easier to handle and shape if you do it on floured parchment, rather than doing it on a surface and the moving it to a pan.
  • You can adjust the rosemary and garlic to taste, and can also sprinkle large flake sea salt on the top if you wish.
  • If you don’t have a bowl scraper, make the cuts in the top with a pizza cutter .
Rosemary Garlic Fougasse

Helpful Resources

  • Richard Bertinet has a video about shaping fougasse–click here to see it. And while it’s obvious that he’s had a LOT of practice, it gives you the general idea of how it works. His kneading technique is also pretty legit. See Prentice reference above.
  • You can absolutely make the cuts with a pizza cutter or knife. However, if you are interested in making bread, these plastic bowl scrapers are worth investing in. They’re cheap and super useful. The link is not an affiliate, just FYI. 🙂
Rosemary Garlic Fougasse
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Rosemary Garlic Fougasse

Rosemary Garlic Fougasse


  • Author: Rebecca Neidhart
  • Prep Time: 15 minutes + about 2 hours rise time
  • Cook Time: 15 minutes/each, 30 minutes total
  • Total Time: 2 hours, 45 minutes
  • Yield: 2 12″ fougasse 1x

Description

A crusty finish gives way to a tender, flavorful crust in this Rosemary Garlic Fougasse. A simple white dough base with added, customizable flavors.


Scale

Ingredients

  • 4 1/4 cups (510 g) unbleached bread flour
  • 1 1/2 tsp. sea salt
  • 3/4 tsp. yeast
  • 2 Tbsp. olive oil
  • 1 1/2 cups (12 oz.) water
  • 2 Tbsp. fresh rosemary, chopped finely
  • 68 cloves garlic, sliced thin

Instructions

In a large mixing bowl, combine the flour, salt, and yeast and stir briefly to combine. Toss in the rosemary and garlic, then pour in the water and olive oil. Using a sturdy mixing spoon or plastic bowl scraper, stir the dough until it has come together. When all of the flour is incorporated and the mixture has become a rough dough, lightly flour the counter and knead by hand until the dough is smooth and elastic.

Shape the dough into a ball, then place it in a clean bowl. Cover it with a clean kitchen towel, then set it in a draft free area to rise. Allow it to rise until soft and doubled in size, about 1-1 1/2 hours.

Preheat the oven to 425F, and place a large metal baking sheet on a rack in the center.

Once it has risen, divide the dough in half with a dough scraper or sharp knife, then set it on a piece of floured parchment. Using your hands, gently stretch the dough into an oval, triangle, or rectangle. Use the scraper, cut a slit down the middle, then 4-5 angled lines down the sides. Finish with several small slits on the edges of the dough. Slide the parchment onto a peel or the back of another baking sheet, then put it on the top of the baking sheet or stone in the preheated oven.

Bake for 15-18 minutes, or until the top has a nice golden brown color.


Notes

  • Rise times will vary based on the temperature of the room it’s rising in, so all times are just an average/estimate. Base the dough’s readiness on the size–it should be doubled in bulk.
  • The dough is much easier to handle and shape if you do it on floured parchment, rather than doing it on a surface and the moving it to a pan
  • You can adjust the rosemary and garlic to taste, and can also sprinkle large flake sea salt on the top if you wish.
  • Category: Breads & Pastries
  • Method: Baking
  • Cuisine: French

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